Shorewall installazione e configurazione



 

Shorewall (Shoreline Firewall) è un firewall che si appoggia al sistema  Netfilter (iptables/ipchains) del kernel Linux, per una più semplice gestione di avanzate configurazioni di rete. Prima di iniziare nell'installazione di shorewall, bisogna prima disinstallare eventualmente l'altro firewall. Esempio: firestarter:

# apt-get remove --purge firestarter

# apt-get install shorewall shorewall-common shorewall-shell shorewall-doc dash

 

1) Partiamo con la configurazione del file interfaces:

# gedit /etc/shorewall/interfaces

all'interno copiamo questo:

# Shorewall version 3.0 – Sample Interfaces File for one-interface configuration.
#
# /etc/shorewall/interfaces
#
# You must add an entry in this file for each network interface on your
# firewall system.
#
# Columns are:
#
# ZONE Zone for this interface. Must match the name of a
# zone defined in /etc/shorewall/zones. You may not
# list the firewall zone in this column.
#
# If the interface serves multiple zones that will be
# defined in the /etc/shorewall/hosts file, you should
# place "-" in this column.
#
# If there are multiple interfaces to the same zone,
# you must list them in separate entries:
#
# Example:
#
# loc eth1 –
# loc eth2 –
#
# INTERFACE Name of interface. Each interface may be listed only
# once in this file. You may NOT specify the name of
# an alias (e.g., eth0:0) here; see
# https://www.shorewall.net/FAQ.htm#faq18
#
# You may specify wildcards here. For example, if you
# want to make an entry that applies to all PPP
# interfaces, use 'ppp+'.
#
# There is no need to define the loopback interface (lo)
# in this file.
#
# BROADCAST The broadcast address for the subnetwork to which the
# interface belongs. For P-T-P interfaces, this
# column is left blank.If the interface has multiple
# addresses on multiple subnets then list the broadcast
# addresses as a comma-separated list.
#
# If you use the special value "detect", the firewall
# will detect the broadcast address for you. If you
# select this option, the interface must be up before
# the firewall is started, you must have iproute
# installed.
#
# If you don't want to give a value for this column but
# you want to enter a value in the OPTIONS column, enter
# "-" in this column.
#
# OPTIONS A comma-separated list of options including the
# following:
#
# dhcp – Specify this option when any of
# the following are true:
# 1. the interface gets its IP address
# via DHCP
# 2. the interface is used by
# a DHCP server running on the firewall
# 3. you have a static IP but are on a LAN
# segment with lots of Laptop DHCP
# clients.
# 4. the interface is a bridge with
# a DHCP server on one port and DHCP
# clients on another port.
#
# norfc1918 – This interface should not receive
# any packets whose source is in one
# of the ranges reserved by RFC 1918
# (i.e., private or "non-routable"
# addresses. If packet mangling or
# connection-tracking match is enabled in
# your kernel, packets whose destination
# addresses are reserved by RFC 1918 are
# also rejected.
#
# routefilter – turn on kernel route filtering for this
# interface (anti-spoofing measure). This
# option can also be enabled globally in
# the /etc/shorewall/shorewall.conf file.
#
# logmartians – turn on kernel martian logging (logging
# of packets with impossible source
# addresses. It is suggested that if you
# set routefilter on an interface that
# you also set logmartians. This option
# may also be enabled globally in the
# /etc/shorewall/shorewall.conf file.
#
# blacklist – Check packets arriving on this interface
# against the /etc/shorewall/blacklist
# file.
#
# maclist – Connection requests from this interface
# are compared against the contents of
# /etc/shorewall/maclist. If this option
# is specified, the interface must be
# an ethernet NIC and must be up before
# Shorewall is started.
#
# tcpflags – Packets arriving on this interface are
# checked for certain illegal combinations
# of TCP flags. Packets found to have
# such a combination of flags are handled
# according to the setting of
# TCP_FLAGS_DISPOSITION after having been
# logged according to the setting of
# TCP_FLAGS_LOG_LEVEL.
#
# proxyarp –
# Sets
# /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/<interface>/proxy_arp.
# Do NOT use this option if you are
# employing Proxy ARP through entries in
# /etc/shorewall/proxyarp. This option is
# intended soley for use with Proxy ARP
# sub-networking as described at:
#
#
# routeback – If specified, indicates that Shorewall
# should include rules that allow
# filtering traffic arriving on this
# interface back out that same interface.
#
# arp_filter – If specified, this interface will only
# respond to ARP who-has requests for IP
# addresses configured on the interface.
# If not specified, the interface can
# respond to ARP who-has requests for
# IP addresses on any of the firewall's
# interface. The interface must be up
# when Shorewall is started.
#
# arp_ignore[=<number>]
# – If specified, this interface will
# respond to arp requests based on the
# value of <number>.
#
# 1 – reply only if the target IP address
# is local address configured on the
# incoming interface
#
# 2 – reply only if the target IP address
# is local address configured on the
# incoming interface and both with the
# sender's IP address are part from same
# subnet on this interface
#
# 3 – do not reply for local addresses
# configured with scope host, only
# resolutions for global and link
# addresses are replied
#
# 4-7 – reserved
#
# 8 – do not reply for all local
# addresses
#
# If no <number> is given then the value
# 1 is assumed
#
# WARNING — DO NOT SPECIFY arp_ignore
# FOR ANY INTERFACE INVOLVED IN PROXY ARP.
#
# nosmurfs – Filter packets for smurfs
# (packets with a broadcast
# address as the source).
#
# Smurfs will be optionally logged based
# on the setting of SMURF_LOG_LEVEL in
# shorewall.conf. After logging, the
# packets are dropped.
#
# detectnets – Automatically taylors the zone named
# in the ZONE column to include only those
# hosts routed through the interface.
#
# upnp – Incoming requests from this interface
# may be remapped via UPNP (upnpd).
#
# WARNING: DO NOT SET THE detectnets OPTION ON YOUR
# INTERNET INTERFACE.
#
# The order in which you list the options is not
# significant but the list should have no embedded white
# space.
#
# Example 1: Suppose you have eth0 connected to a DSL modem and
# eth1 connected to your local network and that your
# local subnet is 192.168.1.0/24. The interface gets
# it's IP address via DHCP from subnet
# 206.191.149.192/27. You have a DMZ with subnet
# 192.168.2.0/24 using eth2.
#
# Your entries for this setup would look like:
#
# net eth0 206.191.149.223 dhcp
# local eth1 192.168.1.255
# dmz eth2 192.168.2.255
#
# Example 2: The same configuration without specifying broadcast
# addresses is:
#
# net eth0 detect dhcp
# loc eth1 detect
# dmz eth2 detect
#
# Example 3: You have a simple dial-in system with no ethernet
# connections.
#
# net ppp0 –
#
# For additional information, see
#
#
###############################################################################
#ZONE INTERFACE BROADCAST OPTIONS
net eth0   detect      routefilter,dhcp,tcpflags,logmartians,nosmurfs
#LAST LINE — ADD YOUR ENTRIES BEFORE THIS ONE — DO NOT REMOVE

 

Attenzione:Se al posto del router abbiamo un modem cambiare eth0 con ppp0. In ogni caso cercare di adattarlo alle nostre esigenze e configurazione.

 

2) Configurazione del file policy:

# gedit /etc/shorewall/policy

all'interno copiamo questo:

# Shorewall version 3.0 – Sample Policy File for one-interface configuration.
#
# /etc/shorewall/policy
#
# THE ORDER OF ENTRIES IN THIS FILE IS IMPORTANT
#
# This file determines what to do with a new connection request if we
# don't get a match from the /etc/shorewall/rules file . For each
# source/destination pair, the file is processed in order until a
# match is found ("all" will match any client or server).
#
# INTRA-ZONE POLICIES ARE PRE-DEFINED
#
# For $FW and for all of the zoned defined in /etc/shorewall/zones,
# the POLICY for connections from the zone to itself is ACCEPT (with no
# logging or TCP connection rate limiting but may be overridden by an
# entry in this file. The overriding entry must be explicit (cannot use
# "all" in the SOURCE or DEST).
#
# Columns are:
#
# SOURCE Source zone. Must be the name of a zone defined
# in /etc/shorewall/zones, $FW or "all".
#
# DEST Destination zone. Must be the name of a zone defined
# in /etc/shorewall/zones, $FW or "all"
#
# POLICY Policy if no match from the rules file is found. Must
# be "ACCEPT", "DROP", "REJECT", "CONTINUE" or "NONE".
#
# ACCEPT – Accept the connection
# DROP – Ignore the connection request
# REJECT – For TCP, send RST. For all other,
# send "port unreachable" ICMP.
# QUEUE – Send the request to a user-space
# application using the QUEUE target.
# CONTINUE – Pass the connection request past
# any other rules that it might also
# match (where the source or
# destination zone in those rules is
# a superset of the SOURCE or DEST
# in this policy).
# NONE – Assume that there will never be any
# packets from this SOURCE
# to this DEST. Shorewall will not set
# up any infrastructure to handle such
# packets and you may not have any
# rules with this SOURCE and DEST in
# the /etc/shorewall/rules file. If
# such a packet _is_ received, the
# result is undefined. NONE may not be
# used if the SOURCE or DEST columns
# contain the firewall zone ($FW) or
# "all".
#
# If this column contains ACCEPT, DROP or REJECT and a
# corresponding common action is defined in
# /etc/shorewall/actions (or
# /usr/share/shorewall/actions.std) then that action
# will be invoked before the policy named in this column
# is enforced.
#
# LOG LEVEL If supplied, each connection handled under the default
# POLICY is logged at that level. If not supplied, no
# log message is generated. See syslog.conf(5) for a
# description of log levels.
#
# Beginning with Shorewall version 1.3.12, you may
# also specify ULOG (must be in upper case). This will
# log to the ULOG target and sent to a separate log
# through use of ulogd
# ).
#
# If you don't want to log but need to specify the
# following column, place "-" here.
#
# LIMIT:BURST If passed, specifies the maximum TCP connection rate
# and the size of an acceptable burst. If not specified,
# TCP connections are not limited.
#
# See for additional information.
#
###############################################################################
#SOURCE DEST POLICY LOG LEVEL LIMIT:BURST
$FW net ACCEPT
net all DROP info
# The FOLLOWING POLICY MUST BE LAST
all all REJECT info
#LAST LINE — ADD YOUR ENTRIES ABOVE THIS LINE — DO NOT REMOVE

 

 

3) Creazione del file di configurazione zones:

# gedit /etc/shorewall/zones

all'interno copiamo questo:

# Shorewall version 3.0 – Sample Zones File for one-interface configuration.
#
# /etc/shorewall/zones
#
# This file determines your network zones.
#
# Columns are:
#
# ZONE Short name of the zone (5 Characters or less in length).
# The names "all" and "none" are reserved and may not be
# used as zone names.
#
# Where a zone is nested in one or more other zones,
# you may follow the (sub)zone name by ":" and a
# comma-separated list of the parent zones. The parent
# zones must have been defined in earlier records in this
# file.
#
# Example:
#
# #ZONE TYPE OPTIONS
# a ipv4
# b ipv4
# c:a,b ipv4
#
# Currently, Shorewall uses this information only to reorder the
# zone list so that parent zones appear after their subzones in
# the list. In the future, Shorewall may make more extensive use
# of that information.
#
# TYPE ipv4 – This is the standard Shorewall zone type and is the
# default if you leave this column empty or if you enter
# "-" in the column. Communication with some zone hosts
# may be encrypted. Encrypted hosts are designated using
# the 'ipsec'option in /etc/shorewall/hosts.
# ipsec – Communication with all zone hosts is encrypted
# Your kernel and iptables must include policy
# match support.
# firewall
# – Designates the firewall itself. You must have
# exactly one 'firewall' zone. No options are
# permitted with a 'firewall' zone. The name that you
# enter in the ZONE column will be stored in the shell
# variable $FW which you may use in other configuration
# files to designate the firewall zone.
#
# OPTIONS, A comma-separated list of options as follows:
# IN OPTIONS,
# OUT OPTIONS reqid=<number> where <number> is specified
# using setkey(8) using the 'unique:<number>
# option for the SPD level.
#
# spi=<number> where <number> is the SPI of
# the SA used to encrypt/decrypt packets.
#
# proto=ah|esp|ipcomp
#
# mss=<number> (sets the MSS field in TCP packets)
#
# mode=transport|tunnel
#
# tunnel-src=<address>[/<mask>] (only
# available with mode=tunnel)
#
# tunnel-dst=<address>[/<mask>] (only
# available with mode=tunnel)
#
# strict Means that packets must match all rules.
#
# next Separates rules; can only be used with
# strict..
#
# Example:
# mode=transport,reqid=44
#
# The options in the OPTIONS column are applied to both incoming
# and outgoing traffic. The IN OPTIONS are applied to incoming
# traffic (in addition to OPTIONS) and the OUT OPTIONS are
# applied to outgoing traffic.
#
# If you wish to leave a column empty but need to make an entry
# in a following column, use "-".
#
# THE ORDER OF THE ENTRIES IN THIS FILE IS IMPORTANT IF YOU HAVE NESTED OR
# OVERLAPPING ZONES DEFINED THROUGH /etc/shorewall/hosts.
#
# See
###############################################################################
#ZONE TYPE OPTIONS IN OUT
# OPTIONS OPTIONS
fw firewall
net ipv4
#LAST LINE – ADD YOUR ENTRIES ABOVE THIS ONE – DO NOT REMOVE

 

 

4) Configurazione del file rules.

# gedit /etc/shorewall/rules

all'interno copiamo questo:

 

# Shorewall version 3.0 – Sample Rules File for one-interface configuration.
#
# /etc/shorewall/rules
#
# Rules in this file govern connection establishment. Requests and
# responses are automatically allowed using connection tracking. For any
# particular (source,dest) pair of zones, the rules are evaluated in the
# order in which they appear in this file and the first match is the one
# that determines the disposition of the request.
#
# In most places where an IP address or subnet is allowed, you
# can preceed the address/subnet with "!" (e.g., !192.168.1.0/24) to
# indicate that the rule matches all addresses except the address/subnet
# given. Notice that no white space is permitted between "!" and the
# address/subnet.
#——————————————————————————
# WARNING: If you masquerade or use SNAT from a local system to the internet,
# you cannot use an ACCEPT rule to allow traffic from the internet to
# that system. You *must* use a DNAT rule instead.
#——————————————————————————
#
# The rules file is divided into sections. Each section is introduced by
# a "Section Header" which is a line beginning with SECTION followed by the
# section name.
#
# Sections are as follows and must appear in the order listed:
#
# ESTABLISHED Packets in the ESTABLISHED state are processed
# by rules in this section.
#
# The only ACTIONs allowed in this section are
# ACCEPT, DROP, REJECT, LOG and QUEUE
#
# There is an implicit ACCEPT rule inserted
# at the end of this section.
#
# RELATED Packets in the RELATED state are processed by
# rules in this section.
#
# The only ACTIONs allowed in this section are
# ACCEPT, DROP, REJECT, LOG and QUEUE
#
# There is an implicit ACCEPT rule inserted
# at the end of this section.
#
# NEW Packets in the NEW and INVALID states are
# processed by rules in this section.
#
# WARNING: If you specify FASTACCEPT=Yes in shorewall.conf then the
# ESTABLISHED and RELATED sections must be empty.
#
# Note: If you are not familiar with Netfilter to the point where you are
# comfortable with the differences between the various connection
# tracking states, then I suggest that you omit the ESTABLISHED and
# RELATED sections and place all of your rules in the NEW section.
#
# You may omit any section that you don't need. If no Section Headers appear
# in the file then all rules are assumed to be in the NEW section.
#
# Columns are:
#
# ACTION ACCEPT, DROP, REJECT, DNAT, DNAT-, REDIRECT, CONTINUE,
# LOG, QUEUE or an <action>.
#
# ACCEPT — allow the connection request
# ACCEPT+ — like ACCEPT but also excludes the
# connection from any subsequent
# DNAT[-] or REDIRECT[-] rules
# NONAT — Excludes the connection from any
# subsequent DNAT[-] or REDIRECT[-]
# rules but doesn't generate a rule
# to accept the traffic.
# DROP — ignore the request
# REJECT — disallow the request and return an
# icmp-unreachable or an RST packet.
# DNAT — Forward the request to another
# system (and optionally another
# port).
# DNAT- — Advanced users only.
# Like DNAT but only generates the
# DNAT iptables rule and not
# the companion ACCEPT rule.
# SAME — Similar to DNAT except that the
# port may not be remapped and when
# multiple server addresses are
# listed, all requests from a given
# remote system go to the same
# server.
# SAME- — Advanced users only.
# Like SAME but only generates the
# NAT iptables rule and not
# the companion ACCEPT rule.
# REDIRECT — Redirect the request to a local
# port on the firewall.
# REDIRECT-
# — Advanced users only.
# Like REDIRET but only generates the
# REDIRECT iptables rule and not
# the companion ACCEPT rule.
#
# CONTINUE — (For experts only). Do not process
# any of the following rules for this
# (source zone,destination zone). If
# The source and/or destination IP
# address falls into a zone defined
# later in /etc/shorewall/zones, this
# connection request will be passed
# to the rules defined for that
# (those) zone(s).
# LOG — Simply log the packet and continue.
# QUEUE — Queue the packet to a user-space
# application such as ftwall
# (https://p2pwall.sf.net).
# <action> — The name of an action defined in
# /etc/shorewall/actions or in
# /usr/share/shorewall/actions.std.
# <macro> — The name of a macro defined in a
# file named macro.<macro-name>. If
# the macro accepts an action
# parameter (Look at the macro
# source to see if it has PARAM in
# the TARGET column) then the macro
# name is followed by "/" and the
# action (ACCEPT, DROP, REJECT, …)
# to be substituted for the
# parameter. Example: FTP/ACCEPT.
#
# The ACTION may optionally be followed
# by ":" and a syslog log level (e.g, REJECT:info or
# DNAT:debug). This causes the packet to be
# logged at the specified level.
#
# If the ACTION names an action defined in
# /etc/shorewall/actions or in
# /usr/share/shorewall/actions.std then:
#
# – If the log level is followed by "!' then all rules
# in the action are logged at the log level.
#
# – If the log level is not followed by "!" then only
# those rules in the action that do not specify
# logging are logged at the specified level.
#
# – The special log level 'none!' suppresses logging
# by the action.
#
# You may also specify ULOG (must be in upper case) as a
# log level.This will log to the ULOG target for routing
# to a separate log through use of ulogd
# ).
#
# Actions specifying logging may be followed by a
# log tag (a string of alphanumeric characters)
# are appended to the string generated by the
# LOGPREFIX (in /etc/shorewall/shorewall.conf).
#
# Example: ACCEPT:info:ftp would include 'ftp '
# at the end of the log prefix generated by the
# LOGPREFIX setting.
#
# SOURCE Source hosts to which the rule applies. May be a zone
# defined in /etc/shorewall/zones, $FW to indicate the
# firewall itself, "all", "all+" or "none" If the ACTION
# is DNAT or REDIRECT, sub-zones of the specified zone
# may be excluded from the rule by following the zone
# name with "!' and a comma-separated list of sub-zone
# names.
#
# When "none" is used either in the SOURCE or DEST
# column, the rule is ignored.
#
# When "all" is used either in the SOURCE or DEST column
# intra-zone traffic is not affected. When "all+" is
# used, intra-zone traffic is affected.
#
# Except when "all[+]" is specified, clients may be
# further restricted to a list of subnets and/or hosts by
# appending ":" and a comma-separated list of subnets
# and/or hosts. Hosts may be specified by IP or MAC
# address; mac addresses must begin with "~" and must use
# "-" as a separator.
#
# Hosts may be specified as an IP address range using the
# syntax <low address>-<high address>. This requires that
# your kernel and iptables contain iprange match support.
# If you kernel and iptables have ipset match support
# then you may give the name of an ipset prefaced by "+".
# The ipset name may be optionally followed by a number
# from 1 to 6 enclosed in square brackets ([]) to
# indicate the number of levels of source bindings to be
# matched.
#
# dmz:192.168.2.2 Host 192.168.2.2 in the DMZ
#
# net:155.186.235.0/24 Subnet 155.186.235.0/24 on the
# Internet
#
# loc:192.168.1.1,192.168.1.2
# Hosts 192.168.1.1 and
# 192.168.1.2 in the local zone.
# loc:~00-A0-C9-15-39-78 Host in the local zone with
# MAC address 00:A0:C9:15:39:78.
#
# net:192.0.2.11-192.0.2.17
# Hosts 192.0.2.11-192.0.2.17 in
# the net zone.
#
# Alternatively, clients may be specified by interface
# by appending ":" to the zone name followed by the
# interface name. For example, loc:eth1 specifies a
# client that communicates with the firewall system
# through eth1. This may be optionally followed by
# another colon (":") and an IP/MAC/subnet address
# as described above (e.g., loc:eth1:192.168.1.5).
#
# DEST Location of Server. May be a zone defined in
# /etc/shorewall/zones, $FW to indicate the firewall
# itself, "all". "all+" or "none".
#
# When "none" is used either in the SOURCE or DEST
# column, the rule is ignored.
#
# When "all" is used either in the SOURCE or DEST column
# intra-zone traffic is not affected. When "all+" is
# used, intra-zone traffic is affected.
#
# Except when "all[+]" is specified, the server may be
# further restricted to a particular subnet, host or
# interface by appending ":" and the subnet, host or
# interface. See above.
#
# Restrictions:
#
# 1. MAC addresses are not allowed.
# 2. In DNAT rules, only IP addresses are
# allowed; no FQDNs or subnet addresses
# are permitted.
# 3. You may not specify both an interface and
# an address.
#
# Like in the SOURCE column, you may specify a range of
# up to 256 IP addresses using the syntax
# <first ip>-<last ip>. When the ACTION is DNAT or DNAT-,
# the connections will be assigned to addresses in the
# range in a round-robin fashion.
#
# If you kernel and iptables have ipset match support
# then you may give the name of an ipset prefaced by "+".
# The ipset name may be optionally followed by a number
# from 1 to 6 enclosed in square brackets ([]) to
# indicate the number of levels of destination bindings
# to be matched. Only one of the SOURCE and DEST columns
# may specify an ipset name.
#
# The port that the server is listening on may be
# included and separated from the server's IP address by
# ":". If omitted, the firewall will not modifiy the
# destination port. A destination port may only be
# included if the ACTION is DNAT or REDIRECT.
#
# Example: loc:192.168.1.3:3128 specifies a local
# server at IP address 192.168.1.3 and listening on port
# 3128. The port number MUST be specified as an integer
# and not as a name from /etc/services.
#
# if the ACTION is REDIRECT, this column needs only to
# contain the port number on the firewall that the
# request should be redirected to.
#
# PROTO Protocol – Must be "tcp", "udp", "icmp", "ipp2p",
# "ipp2p:udp", "ipp2p:all" a number, or "all".
# "ipp2p*" requires ipp2p match support in your kernel
# and iptables.
#
# DEST PORT(S) Destination Ports. A comma-separated list of Port
# names (from /etc/services), port numbers or port
# ranges; if the protocol is "icmp", this column is
# interpreted as the destination icmp-type(s).
#
# If the protocol is ipp2p, this column is interpreted
# as an ipp2p option without the leading "–" (example
# "bit" for bit-torrent). If no port is given, "ipp2p" is
# assumed.
#
# A port range is expressed as <low port>:<high port>.
#
# This column is ignored if PROTOCOL = all but must be
# entered if any of the following ields are supplied.
# In that case, it is suggested that this field contain
# "-"
#
# If your kernel contains multi-port match support, then
# only a single Netfilter rule will be generated if in
# this list and the CLIENT PORT(S) list below:
# 1. There are 15 or less ports listed.
# 2. No port ranges are included.
# Otherwise, a separate rule will be generated for each
# port.
#
# CLIENT PORT(S) (Optional) Port(s) used by the client. If omitted,
# any source port is acceptable. Specified as a comma-
# separated list of port names, port numbers or port
# ranges.
#
# If you don't want to restrict client ports but need to
# specify an ORIGINAL DEST in the next column, then
# place "-" in this column.
#
# If your kernel contains multi-port match support, then
# only a single Netfilter rule will be generated if in
# this list and the DEST PORT(S) list above:
# 1. There are 15 or less ports listed.
# 2. No port ranges are included.
# Otherwise, a separate rule will be generated for each
# port.
#
# ORIGINAL DEST (0ptional) — If ACTION is DNAT[-] or REDIRECT[-]
# then if included and different from the IP
# address given in the SERVER column, this is an address
# on some interface on the firewall and connections to
# that address will be forwarded to the IP and port
# specified in the DEST column.
#
# A comma-separated list of addresses may also be used.
# This is usually most useful with the REDIRECT target
# where you want to redirect traffic destined for
# particular set of hosts.
#
# Finally, if the list of addresses begins with "!" then
# the rule will be followed only if the original
# destination address in the connection request does not
# match any of the addresses listed.
#
# For other actions, this column may be included and may
# contain one or more addresses (host or network)
# separated by commas. Address ranges are not allowed.
# When this column is supplied, rules are generated
# that require that the original destination address
# matches one of the listed addresses. This feature is
# most useful when you want to generate a filter rule
# that corresponds to a DNAT- or REDIRECT- rule. In this
# usage, the list of addresses should not begin with "!".
#
# See https://shorewall.net/PortKnocking.html for an
# example of using an entry in this column with a
# user-defined action rule.
#
# RATE LIMIT You may rate-limit the rule by placing a value in
# this colume:
#
# <rate>/<interval>[:<burst>]
#
# where <rate> is the number of connections per
# <interval> ("sec" or "min") and <burst> is the
# largest burst permitted. If no <burst> is given,
# a value of 5 is assumed. There may be no
# no whitespace embedded in the specification.
#
# Example: 10/sec:20
#
# USER/GROUP This column may only be non-empty if the SOURCE is
# the firewall itself.
#
# The column may contain:
#
# [!][<user name or number>][:<group name or number>][+<program name>]
#
# When this column is non-empty, the rule applies only
# if the program generating the output is running under
# the effective <user> and/or <group> specified (or is
# NOT running under that id if "!" is given).
#
# Examples:
#
# joe #program must be run by joe
# :kids #program must be run by a member of
# #the 'kids' group
# !:kids #program must not be run by a member
# #of the 'kids' group
# +upnpd #program named upnpd (This feature was
# #removed from Netfilter in kernel
# #version 2.6.14).
#
# Example: Accept SMTP requests from the DMZ to the internet
#
# #ACTION SOURCE DEST PROTO DEST SOURCE ORIGINAL
# # PORT PORT(S) DEST
# ACCEPT dmz net tcp smtp
#
# Example: Forward all ssh and https connection requests from the
# internet to local system 192.168.1.3
#
# #ACTION SOURCE DEST PROTO DEST SOURCE ORIGINAL
# # PORT PORT(S) DEST
# DNAT net loc:192.168.1.3 tcp ssh,https
#
# Example: Forward all https connection requests from the internet
# to local system 192.168.1.3 with a limit of 3 per second and
# a maximum burst of 10
#
# #ACTION SOURCE DEST PROTO DEST SOURCE ORIGINAL RATE
# # PORT PORT(S) DEST LIMIT
# DNAT net loc:192.168.1.3 tcp https – – 3/sec:10
#
# Example: Redirect all locally-originating www connection requests to
# port 3128 on the firewall (Squid running on the firewall
# system) except when the destination address is 192.168.2.2
#
# #ACTION SOURCE DEST PROTO DEST SOURCE ORIGINAL
# # PORT PORT(S) DEST
# REDIRECT loc 3128 tcp www – !192.168.2.2
#
# Example: All https requests from the internet to address
# 130.252.100.69 are to be forwarded to 192.168.1.3
#
# #ACTION SOURCE DEST PROTO DEST SOURCE ORIGINAL
# # PORT PORT(S) DEST
# DNAT net loc:192.168.1.3 tcp 80 – 130.252.100.69
#
# Example: You want to accept SSH connections to your firewall only
# from internet IP addresses 130.252.100.69 and 130.252.100.70
#
# #ACTION SOURCE DEST PROTO DEST SOURCE ORIGINAL
# # PORT PORT(S) DEST
# ACCEPT net:130.252.100.69,130.252.100.70 $FW \
# tcp 22
################################################################
#ACTION SOURCE DEST PROTO DEST SOURCE ORIGINAL RATE USER/
# PORT PORT(S) DEST LIMIT GROUP

# Reject Ping from the "bad" net zone.. and prevent your log from being flooded..

Ping/REJECT net $FW

# Permit all ICMP traffic FROM the firewall TO the net zone

ACCEPT $FW net icmp

#LAST LINE — ADD YOUR ENTRIES BEFORE THIS ONE — DO NOT REMOVE

 

In questo file vengono settate le regole di accesso, quindi è qui che a secondo delle esigenze di ognuno di noi vanno aperte le porte per i programmi che noi utilizziamo.  Facendo degli esempi con Amule, Deluge, Ftp, prima dell'ultima riga:

#LAST LINE — ADD YOUR ENTRIES BEFORE THIS ONE — DO NOT REMOVE

vanno inserite le regole:

# aMule
ACCEPT        net        $FW        tcp         4662
ACCEPT        $FW        net        tcp         4662
ACCEPT        net        $FW        udp        4672
ACCEPT        $FW        net        udp        4672
ACCEPT        net        $FW        udp        4665
ACCEPT        $FW        net        udp        4665

# Ftp modo passivo
ACCEPT          net             $FW             tcp             21
ACCEPT          $FW             net             tcp             21
ACCEPT          net             $FW             tcp             50000:50100
ACCEPT          $FW             net             tcp             50000:50100

#deluge
ACCEPT        net        $FW         tcp        6881:6889
ACCEPT        $FW        net         tcp        6881:6889

 

5) Per attivare shorewall all'avvio:

# gedit /etc/default/shorewall

e rimpiazzare "startup=0" con "startup=1"

6) Lanciare shorewall:

# shorewall start

7) Dopo aver fatto qualche modifica:

# shorewall restart

Per moltissime altre info, soprattutto più esaurienti e complete direttamente qua.

 

Post simili (quasi):

7 pensieri riguardo “Shorewall installazione e configurazione”

  1. Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

    A me pare inutile riportare tutta sta roba se poi ci sono solo due righe scarne di spiegazione…

    Bah,

  2. Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

    @ FussyPenguin

    In realtà io ho riportato quella che può essere una configurazione base, per un uso più o meno immediato, e mi sembra che sia abbastanza esauriente 🙂 Certamente, a secondo delle nostre esigenze di configurazione, di approfondimenti ce ne sarebbero tanti, ma per quello e meglio rimandare alle faq di shorewall, altrimenti si rischia di scrivere un volume lungo come quello di Guerra e Pace. Ciao 😉

  3. Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

    Ciao Edmond,
    dato che sei esperto in shorewall e lo uso anch io, ti posto un quesito a cui non so ancora rispondermi…..
    In shorewall e possibile differenziare i log in più file???

    da 2 regole tipo
    DNAT:info1 wan lan:10.0.0.2 tcp 22
    DNAT:info2 wan lan:10.0.0.2 tcp 110

    in modo da avere 2 file distinti quali
    /var/log/info1
    /var/log/info2

    grazie ciao…

  4. Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

    Ciao newsert in questo momento non riesco a fare delle prove, spero di riuscire a risponderti al più presto, nel caso trovassi tu per primo la soluzione postala pure.

  5. Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

    Soluzione….

    Installare syslog-ng, nel file /etc/syslog-ng/syslog-ng.conf alla voce destinations aggiungere questo script

    destination df_dnatTCP22 { file(/var/log/info1.log); };
    filter f_dnat0 { match(DNAT); };
    filter f_dnat1 { match(DPT=22); };
    log {
    source(s_all);
    filter(f_dnat0);
    filter(f_dnat1);
    destination(df_dnatTCP22);
    };
    destination df_dnatTCP110 { file(/var/log/info2.log); };
    filter f_dnat0 { match(DNAT); };
    filter f_dnat1 { match(DPT=110); };
    log {
    source(s_all);
    filter(f_dnat0);
    filter(f_dnat1);
    destination(df_dnatTCP110);
    };

    Cosi ho risolto la mia necessità… comunque il sistema non ha una immediata elasticità come immaginavo, per ogni porta bisogna fare una regola e la cosa e un pochino complessa….
    Comunque a me basta e spero anche a voi…..

    Edmond scusa, hai mai usato fwlogwatch???
    e un bel programmino che sto usando per implementare shorewalll..

    CiauzzZzz

  6. Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

    Grazie per aver postato la soluzione, spero di poterla provare al più presto. Per quanto riguarda fwlogwatch non l’ho mai provato anche perchè non ho necessità di report per quanto riguarda la mia rete. Ciao 😉

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